Wednesday, June 16, 2021

Dancing on Oahu ReRun #4

This island doing pretty good all over. Taking it slow but that is all right too. No news from Kokohead, everybody goes to town for that. They should do as they please.

"It is still true that you cannot bring yourself up
by bringing someone else down."

Meanwhile the rest of the island is jumping. We just got some news from Aunty Maili, (Wahaiwa Ballroom Dance Club) and it is all good news. The beautiful poster for those wanting to drive. This is your great opportunity.


Now that is getting the information to the dancers. These people are developing into the most important people in Dance Blogging on this island.

Paniolo Country by Melveen Leed

Also just received from Aunty Maili:
A nice way to spend a Friday evening from Deanie Bates, President of Aiea Ballroom Dance Assoiciation.

Aiea Ballroom Announcement.
Hope you guys can be with us this Friday, 4/10, at the Palladium for our dance. Time is 6-9:30 pm; color theme is PINK w/ any other color you want. Refreshments at half time. Full ballroom. Bert will dj. Deanie


Pub's Side Note: On the Internet, and people do say what they think.
"The property taxes and sales taxes will go sky high, now that the people got fooled into this dumb choo choo train that goes nowhere. Do like any intelligent human being would do, who doesn't want to go broke and end up homeless. Sell your house and move."

Sunday, June 6, 2021

Bossa Nova Rerun #1

By Jon Buenaventura, Turtle Bay
Bossa Nova remains to this day, some of the best music in the world with some of the best movements in dance to go with it. And it came into being when there were a lot of fad dances coming in. In the US and Europe, the local ones were backed heavily by the local disciplines and dance studios. The Bossa Nova articulated existing social differences in the United States, those of the elite versus the masses attempting to attain elite status, and the subsequent devaluation of the musical style as a result of its success.

"Dance music doesn't care where you live. It doesn't care who your friends
are. It doesn't care how much money you make. It doesn't care
if you're 74 or if you are 24 because it is for everyone."


In addition, there were fundamental shifts in how musicians arranged Bossa Nova songs in their recordings to cut across those social divisions for mass-market appeal. For this reason, the sounds of the music as recorded or practiced by musicians are as important as the performance  and spectatorship of the Bossa Nova dance for explaining the rapid spread of the Bossa Nova as dance throughout the U.S. The popular culture made it especially true as expressed in print media, recordings, and television programs.

"Corcovado" by Lisa Ono


Bossa Nova’s transformation into a social dance in the U.S. is crucial to its international history, but it had an established social context long before all of that dancing. Bossa Nova as a social movement began in the late 1950s among a group of musicians in the richest areas of Rio de Janeiro’s south zone. The musicians involved, took the basic polyrhythmic elements of urban samba and transformed them to a cosmopolitan perspective that matched the overall mood of the period. At the time, the upper classes in Brazil were experiencing a rush of optimism in country. In the US it went the way of all fads. World wide, it remains as one of the best.

"Social Dancers know there's good deeds and then there's good intentions.
They are as far apart as Heaven and Hell."